OUR YEAR

ANNUAL REPORT 2017

Clermont County, Ohio

OUR COMMISSIONERS

Commissioner Ed Humphrey discusses 2017’s major transportation projects, and how they have helped the county.

Commissioner Ed Humphrey discusses 2017’s major transportation projects, and how they have helped the county.

Commissioner David Painter shares his thoughts on accomplishments in the fight against opioids.

Commissioner David Painter shares his thoughts on accomplishments in the fight against opioids.

Commissioner David Uible looks at the county’s financial strength and economic development goals.

Commissioner David Uible looks at the county’s financial strength and economic development goals.

OUR GROWTH

POPULATION

2010

2017

%

INCREASE

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

%

2010

%

2017

%

DECREASE

HOUSEHOLDS

2010

2017

%

INCREASE

IN 2017 WE SPENT $1.3B ON SHELTER

IN 2017 WE SPENT $463M ON HEALTH CARE

IN 2017 WE SPENT $409M EATING IN

HOUSEHOLDS

MEDIAN INCOME

2010

2017

%

INCREASE

PER CAPITA INCOME

2010

2017

%

INCREASE

IN 2017 WE SPENT $174M ON APPAREL & SERVICES

IN 2017 WE SPENT $255M ON ENTERTAINMENT

IN 2017 WE SPENT $272M EATING OUT

REAL ESTATE

HOUSING STARTS

2010

2017

%

INCREASE

HOUSING SALES

2010

2017

%

INCREASE

TOTAL RESIDENTIAL APPRAISED VALUE

2010

2017

%

INCREASE

BUILDING PERMITS

2010

2017

%

INCREASE

IN 2017 WE SPENT $167M ON TRAVEL

IN 2017 WE SPENT $114M ON EDUCATION

SALES TAX REVENUE

2010

2017

%

INCREASE

Sources: ESRI Community Profiles; Bureau of Labor Statistics, Clermont County Auditor’s Office, Clermont County Building Inspection Department, Clermont County Office of Management and Budget, US Census Bureau

OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

INFRASTRUCTURE

It was a busy year for the Clermont County Engineer’s Office and the Transportation Improvement District, where “The Big 3” grabbed headlines. In addition to intersection improvements that supported better and safer travel at the new West Clermont High School, and infrastructure to support the development of South Afton Industrial Park, work on Aicholtz Road, Old SR 74 and Wolfpen-Pleasant Hill were important improvements for our residents and those who travel to and through Clermont County.

AICHOLTZ ROAD CONNECTOR

 

The Aicholtz Road Connector in Union Township has re-established a vital link in the Eastgate roadway network by reopening a portion of Aicholtz Road that was split off when I-275 was originally built.

What we did:

  • Widened Aicholtz and added new lanes
  • Added a center turn lane, easing congestion
  • Added a sidewalk on the south side of the street connecting to Ivy Pointe

What it means:

Drivers traveling between the Eastgate area and Mt. Carmel Tobasco Road have an alternate route to SR 32.

COST

OLD SR 74 WIDENING

 

This well-traveled corridor – Old SR 74 between Olive Branch-Stonelick Road and Armstrong Boulevard – was narrow and rough.

What we did:

  • Widened Old SR 74
  • Added a center turn lane
  • Widened shoulders, added new curbs,
  • Improved gutter drainage
  • Improved pedestrian access
  • Upgraded signals

What it means:

This project supports the recently completed Old SR 74 extension to College Drive, and the road will better accommodate increased traffic.

COST

WOLFPEN-PLEASANT HILL SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS

 

Wolfpen-Pleasant Hill Road in Miami Township was filled with sharp curves and narrow shoulders and iced easily in winter.

 What we did: 

  • Realigned the road
  • Built retaining walls
  • Made drainage improvements

 What it means: 

The road is less steep, has better visibility and is safer for drivers, especially in wet weather.

COST

HOW ARE ROAD PROJECTS FINANCED?

County road improvements are funded through revenue from license tags and the gasoline tax. Bigger road projects that support economic development and help create local jobs are funded by the Clermont County Transportation Improvement District (read more at GoClermont.org). Funding for those projects comes from a combination of state and federal transportation grants, as well as contributions from its members, which include Clermont County, Miami Township and Union Township.

OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

PUBLIC SAFETY
The Sheriff’s Office marked its first year under the leadership of Sheriff Robert S. (Steve) Leahy. Sheriff Leahy named several new command staff officers, as well as a new civilian county jail administrator.  The Sheriff’s Office was also an integral part of the county’s efforts to find solutions to the opioid problems facing the region. Read more in the Opiate Task Force section.
In 2017, the Sheriff’s Office had a budget of $19.4 million.

CALLS FOR SERVICE AND ARRESTS

Sheriff’s deputies responded to more than 60,000 calls for service in 2017 and made more than 2,029 criminal arrests. That compares to more than 52,000 calls and 3,000 arrests in 2016.

 

JUVENILE FELONY ARRESTS

JUVENILE MISDEMEANOR ARRESTS

ADULT MISDEMEANOR ARRESTS

ADULT FELONY ARRESTS

TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT

  • 3,822 traffic citations
  • 5,441 traffic warnings
INVESTIGATIVE DIVISION

This office, overseen by Capt. Greg Moran, is staffed by six detectives and a detective sergeant. These detectives investigate crimes that are considered more complex and severe, including burglary, assault, homicide, sexual assault, child pornography, and financial crimes.

ARRESTS

FELONY CHARGES FILED

MISDEMEANOR CHARGES FILED

NARCOTICS DIVISION

The Narcotics Unit spans several jurisdictions, including the Sheriff’s Office, Miami, Goshen, Union and Pierce townships, and is led by Sheriff’s Lt. Doug Ventre. Some of the numbers for 2017:

ARRESTS

GRAMS OF CRACK

GRAMS OF HEROIN

GRAMS OF COCAINE

LBS OF MARIJUANA

GRAMS OF METH

METH LABS ELIMINATED

SPECIAL RESPONSE TEAM


This is essentially the Sheriff’s SWAT team. It responds to hostage situations, or when people barricade themselves. The team tracks fugitives and executes high-risk search warrants.  Even a robot that can be used in high-risk situations is now part of the team! In 2017, the Special Response Team responded to six high-risk calls.

TASK FORCE ONE


Did you know that Clermont County has an underwater search-and-rescue team? This unit is a partnership among the Clermont and Hamilton County sheriffs and the Loveland- Symmes Fire Department. Besides search and rescue operations, the team can recover bodies and evidence.  In 2017, Task Force One responded to four calls for service.

K9 UNIT

Clermont County has eight K9 officers – and that includes German shepherds Mox and Paik, Belgian Malinois Paco, and Dozer, a bloodhound. These highly trained animals – and their deputy handlers — train constantly, and are instrumental in narcotics arrests. In fact, in 2017, the K9 teams went out more than 1,600 times, which resulted in 212 suspects charged.

COUNTY JAIL

Clermont County Jail is led by a new administrator, Joe Palmer. Among the initiatives in 2017:

  • A body scanner, which helps to ensure that no contraband is smuggled into the jail. The scanner cost $187,000 and was paid through the jail’s commissary fund.
  • Greater attention to inmates’ mental illness issues. This involves close coordination with Greater Cincinnati Behavioral Health Services, Child Focus, and the Clermont County Mental Health & Recovery Board.
  • Inmate enrollment into Medicaid if eligible
  • Average daily enrollment: 276 men; 80 women

MEET JAIL ADMINISTRATOR JOE PALMER

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE BODY SCANNER

NATIONAL NIGHT OUT

Community outreach is important to the Sheriff’s Office. Sheriff Leahy and his officers and staff held their first National Night Out at the Batavia Township Community Center in August. This annual event promotes community and neighborhood safety. More than 800 residents of Clermont County attended this event!

OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

HUMAN SERVICES

Much of the work that we would consider as human or social services is done through the Clermont Department of Job & Family Services (DJFS). DJFS encompasses four primary divisions: Children’s Protective Services, Child Support, Public Assistance, and OhioMeansJobs/Clermont. It works closely with other county agencies and non-profit organizations to ensure that the social safety net for those most in need and at risk in our county is intact.

Clermont Senior Services, the Clermont County Board of Developmental Disabilities, Clermont County Public Health, and the Clermont Mental Health and Recovery Board are also all part of the human services network in Clermont County.

DJFS is primarily funded through state and federal funds. In 2017, its budget was $24.8 million.

CPS investigated more than 1,200 reports of child abuse in 2017. These reports come from law enforcement, schools, relatives and neighbors. In 2017, Juvenile Court gave CPS custody of 94 children who could not remain safely at home. After CPS becomes involved, 94% of children who were abused do not suffer additional abuse. 

1,200+

Reports of child abuse

94

Children in CPS custody

94%

Suffer no additional abuse

86
FOSTER FAMILIES

Foster care: CPS could not do its job without having a source of reliable and loving foster care families.

CPS currently works with 86 foster care families.

The Rice Family — longtime foster care and adoptive parents.

38

Adoptions

Adoptions: CPS found adoptive homes for 38 children whom Juvenile Court determined could never return to their biological parents.

And remember: It’s all of our responsibility to keep the children of Clermont County safe. Children’s Protective Services values and depends on collaboration with community agencies and private citizens to protect our county’s children. To report concerns of child abuse call 513.732.STOP. To learn more about becoming a foster parent call 513.732.7765.

Learn more about Children’s Protective Services

During 2017, Clermont County Department of Job and Family Services, Division of Child Support, administered 13,248 open cases serving 46,266 individuals (adults and children).  Almost $36 million was collected on behalf of the families served.

13,248

Open cases

46,266

Individuals served

$36M

Collected for families served

WARRANTS RECALLED

During the month of March, the Division of Child Support held an amnesty on existing child support civil warrants.  At the time, there were 722 outstanding warrants with $9.6 million in child support arrearages. The purpose of the amnesty was to reduce the volume of existing warrants and to help parents get back on track. It was a success: 120 warrants were recalled. Those parents arranged to begin making child support payments, and to start paying past due support.

Kudos to Child Support: The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, Office of Child Support, recognized Clermont County Division of Child Support with two Outstanding Performance Awards.

Learn more about Child Support

Public Assistance administers financial aid and food assistance for people who fall below certain income levels. Most of this funding comes from the federal government, for programs such as Temporary Aid to Need Families (TANF/cash assistance) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program/SNAP, also known as Food Assistance. Medicaid is funded at both the federal and state level.

Many of these residents work in low-paying jobs.

36,813

Residents received some form of Medicaid

500

Families received child care vouchers for 871 children

14,369

Residents received Food Assistance or 6,644 families

479

Families – 817 residents – received cash assistance

Learn more about Public Assistance

OhioMeansJobs

Clermont County

OMJ seeks to connect those who are looking for work to employers. It works on behalf of people who have been downsized, or have just had trouble finding work. Its Business Services staff actively engages with employers in Clermont County, helping them to find qualified workers and setting up hiring events and job fairs.

VISITS TO OMJ

HIRING EVENTS HELD

JOB ORDERS PLACED

528-SAVE

The Clermont County Mental Health & Recovery Board  funds a 24-7 crisis hotline that is staffed by Child Focus. Based on the need, callers are referred to various behavioral health resources including mental health services and substance use disorder services. Those who appear to be in danger of taking their lives are assisted with hospital admission.

2017 CRISIS HOTLINE CALLS

OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

PUBLIC HEALTH

2017 was a banner year for Clermont County Public Health. After a long and demanding process – one which began in 2011 — it became accredited by the national Public Health Accreditation Board. The agency showed that it met or exceeded a set of high standards by going through a self-assessment and a peer review.

Clermont County Public Health’s mission is to strive to improve our county by preventing disease, promoting health, and protecting the environment.

Here is how the agency did that in 2017.

WIC

Public Health administers the federal Women, Infants, and Children supplemental nutrition program. For low-income women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or post-partum and not breastfeeding, this program provides important nutritional education, and supplements the purchase of healthy foods for these moms and their children up to the age of 5. 

In 2017, there were 10,362 visits to the WIC office in Clermont County!

SHOTS AND VACCINES

Flu vaccines given

Children's vaccines given

FOOD INSPECTIONS

Food establishment inspections

BIRTH CERTIFICATES

Public Health’s Vital Statistics staff handles both birth and death certificates. In 2017, the agency processed 4,443 birth certificates – 420 more than the previous high!  

CHILD CAR SEATS

Free car seats provided

In 2017, Public Health provided low-income parents with 66 free child car seats, though the Ohio Buckles Buckeyes Program.

FAMILY FUN ADVENTURE CHALLENGE

More than 300 people participated in the second annual Family Fun Adventure Challenge in May hosted by Batavia Township. The family-friendly obstacle course and fun run encouraged families to get active. As part of the event, Clermont County Public Health gave away 50 bicycle helmets to local children.

OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

OPIATE TASK FORCE

Although the final numbers are not in, Clermont County has seen a decrease in the number of overdose deaths since the high of 94 in 2015. That hasn’t happened by accident.

The collaborative work of the Clermont County Opiate Task Force – the backbone collaboration that has been at the forefront of the county’s opioid fight since 2013 – continues to yield new approaches – and some progress.

But these initiatives cost money.

In 2015, voters approved an additional 0.25-mill levy supporting the Clermont County Mental Health & Recovery Board, increasing annual levy revenue from $2 million to $3 million. Those increased revenues in 2017 have allowed the board to fund many more services. That, plus diligent pursuit of grants and other revenue streams, has helped to fund these initiatives.

In 2017, MHRB spent over $1.9 million on addiction treatment services.   

The Opiate Task Force began 2017 with several goals. Here are some of the accomplishments.

GOAL:  Increase the availability of treatment for indigent, uninsured, or underinsured residents

Detox services are now available in the county through collaboration between Clermont Recovery Center and Mercy Health — Clermont Hospital. Detox services are also available outside the county.

Additional doctors have been hired at the Clermont Recovery Center and Northland – two of the largest treatment centers in the county. In 2017, 450 clients received medication-assisted treatment (MAT) at the Clermont Recovery Center, an increase of 57%

MAT is provided for clients at the Community Alternative Sentencing Center.

Funding:  Mental Health & Recovery Board levy and state funds

GOAL:  Establish recovery housing in Clermont County. This allows for a safe, substance-free and supportive environment.

A recovery house for men was opened in Pierce Township in 2017. It houses seven men. Currently, capital funds are being pursued that would fund a recovery house for women.

Funding:  Mental Health & Recovery Board levy and state funds

GOAL:  Increase the number of Quick Response Teams
and recovery coaches

\

Eight peer recovery coaches from the Clermont Recovery Center provide outreach in the community, at the hospital, and now work on three Quick Response Teams  throughout the county.  These teams are connected to police and/or fire/EMS departments, and also include the Sheriff’s Office. 

R

In 2017, the Quick Response Team in Union Township connected with 82% of the individuals who survived an overdose and agreed to a referral. Of those, 74% agreed to engage in treatment services.

The Sheriff’s Office QRT began in October 2017. Since then, 45 individuals who survived an overdose have been referred to the QRT and contact was made with 70% of them. Many individuals are still in the process of being engaged in treatment. 

:

Also in October, the City of Milford and Miami Township Fire/EMS and Police also started a QRT. Similar outreach is occurring in Felicity.

The team also made contact with 127 individuals who survived an overdose and were taken to Mercy Health -Clermont Hospital.  Of those, 51% agreed to engage in treatment. 

Funding:  Funding for the coaches and teams comes from Interact for Health, the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, and Mental Health & Recovery Board’s levy, state funding and grant funding.

GOAL:  Increase outreach and education to the community

  • The Opiate Task Force launched a new website, GetCleanNowClermont.org, packed with information for those seeking help and for families and loved ones.
  • Get Clean Now also launched a Facebook page, and presents Facebook live videos once a month. The first seven videos have been viewed 20,000 times.
  • 50 presentations in the community.
  • Billboard PSAs, bus PSAs, mall PSAs, booths at community events.

Funding:  Website funded through a private donation; PSAs funded by the Mental Health & Recovery Board and Public Health grant funding.

GOAL:  Develop prevention programs in local schools

  • Life Skills Training program adopted in several area elementary, middle and high schools.
  • Youth-led prevention programs developed at Milford and West Clermont high schools.

Funding: Coalition for a Drug Free Clermont County via the Drug Free Communities grant, and the Mental Health & Recovery Board.

GOAL:  Increase community-based Narcan distribution

Narcan helps to prevent overdose deaths.

Two more police departments began to carry Narcan in 2017. Amelia, Goshen, Pierce Township, New Richmond, the Clermont Sheriff’s Office, and Ohio State Patrol all now carry Narcan.

The county’s Project Dawn, located at the Clermont Recovery Center, distributed 256 Narcan kits during 2017.

Funding:  Provided by the Ohio Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services to Clermont County Public Health,

and the Mental Health & Recovery Board.

GOAL:  Reduce the supply of narcotics

Directed patrols put more police presence on known routes for those seeking to buy drugs. The Sheriff’s Office conducted 18 directed patrols in 2017.

 

  • 17 arrests for possession of drugs
  • 12 arrests for drug paraphernalia
  • Multiple warrants

Other 2017 milestones:

 

Clermont County opened a women’s wing in the Community Alternative Sentencing Center. Women who are convicted of drug-related misdemeanors can enter treatment instead of jail.

On tap for 2018:

 

Clermont County Public Health is launching a syringe services program that will offer services including syringe exchange, safe disposal of needles, and HIV and hepatitis C testing. It will also povide referrals to substance use disorder treatment. This program will help to counteract the alarming increase in hepatitis C and HIV cases in Clermont County, which will have astronomical health costs.

*Clermont County  government agencies and organizations that comprise the Opiate Task Force include:

County Commissioners
Coroner
Job & Family Services
Mental Health & Recovery Board
Municipal and Common Pleas Court Probation Divisions
Prosecutor’s Office
Public Defender’s Office
Public Health
Sheriff’s Office

Other members come from community nonprofits, treatment centers, Mercy Health, law enforcement agencies, recovery support groups, and concerned citizens.  The OTF is co-chaired by the Mental Health &  Recovery Board and the Sheriff’s Office.

OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

BUILDING PROJECTS

A new wing at Domestic Relations Court

For 10 years, the Domestic Relations Court staff of Clerk of Courts Barbara Wiedenbein worked in a triple-wide trailer outside the courthouse. Now, the 4,000-square-feet courtroom wing offers plenty of room for staff and customers.

The addition — whose exterior is brick, like the existing building — cost about $962,000. It houses files and records on divorces and dissolutions and other domestic-related orders.

 

911 Communications Center

In 2017, the county completed work on two communications towers, allowing dispatchers seamless contact with first responders throughout Clermont County. These new towers eliminated some spots in the county where first responders could not clearly communicate with dispatch operators.

A tower was added at Mount Repose in Miami Township at a total cost of almost $1.5 million. Another new tower was constructed on Wayne Township Fire Department property, at a cost of approximately $1.6 million. 

These projects accompanied upgrades to the Computer-Aided Dispatch (CAD) system in 2016 that integrated the county into the Ohio Department of Public Safety’s MARCS Multi-Agency Radio Communications System.

OUR STORIES

Lyle Bloom, Director of the Water Resources Departments, talks about the four major water projects on tap for 2018.

Hannah Lubbers of the Office of Environmental Quality discusses the groundbreaking work that is being done to protect the health of Harsha Lake.

Karen Smedley of Children’s Protective Services describes what CPS does when it receives a report of abuse or neglect.

OUR FINANCIALS

2017 All Funds Revenues

Revenue Type 2017 Revenues
Charges for Services $39,702,554 17%
Fines & Forfeitures $1,205,111 1%
Intergovernmental $37,003,696 16%
Investment Earnings $1,190,464 1%
Licenses & Permits $1,818,170 1%
Permissive Sales Tax $30,959,065 14%
Property Taxes $44,639,250 20%
Other Taxes $7,646,373 3%
Water & Sewer Charges $31,830,885 14%
Other Revenues $4,873,892 2%
Non-Operating $5,803,341 3%
Transfers from Other Funds $21,508,418 9%
Total $228,181,219

2017 All Funds Expenses

Service Group 2017 Expenses
Criminal Justice $27,627,926 13%
General Government $21,238,910 10%
Environmental & Water Resources $48,020,336 22%
Health & Human Services $60,733,550 28%
Transportation $17,129,570 8%
Internal Services $16,954,060 8%
Judicial Services $13,468,731 6%
Non-Operating $4,447,358 2%
Parks $1,538,426 1%
Public Safety $5,185,248 2%
Total $216,344,114

The General Fund is the largest discretionary source of funds in the county and finances 20 of 21 elected offices in Clermont County.

2017 General Fund Revenues

Revenue Source
Sales Tax $28,394,006.26 47.2%
Charges for Services $10,710,221.35 17.8%
Property Taxes $7,966,862.30 13.2%
Intergovernmental $5,542,336.22 9.2%
Licenses & Permits $1,254,022.62 2.1%
Other Revenues $590,154.91 1.0%
Fines & Forfeitures $746,735.53 1.2%
Investment Income $1,135,872.88 1.9%
Total Operating Revenues $56,340,212.07 93.6%
Non-Operating $3,847,651.45 6.4%
Total General Fund Revenues $60,187,863.52 100.0%

2017 General Fund Expenses

Expenses by Function
Criminal Justice $23,429,541.53 40.3%
Judicial Services $12,323,009.43 21.2%
General Government $10,987,614.58 18.9%
Public Safety $3,930,743.69 6.8%
Health & Human Services $2,926,088.64 5.0%
Total Operating Expenses $53,596,997.87 92.2%
Non-Operating $4,559,113.23 7.8%
Total General Fund Expenses $58,156,111.10 100.0%

General Fund Operating Revenue Growth

  • 2010
  • 2011
  • 2012
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
Year Revenue in Millions
2010 $47.2
2011 $47.1
2012 $47.1
2013 $49.6
2014 $50.5
2015 $53.2
2016 $55.5
2017 $56.3